HALTER CEMETERY
Located on State Route 12 
John and Elizabeth Halter deeded 0.75 acres to the trustees of St John’s Lutheran and Reformed congregation on May 6, 1848 for a meeting house and burying ground.   The church eventually disbanded in the later years.  The church still remains today but is the residence of Dr. Stone and the house farm. In 1898 Catharine Halter deeded 1.1 acre cemetery to R.E. Lenner.  A few years later, R.W. Lenner lost the property through a sheriff’s sale.  The Township took over but the year is unknown.

 

 

 

HILL CEMETERY
Located on State Route 53
Hill Cemetery which is also known as Hills corner, Salem and Chapel Hill was the first cemetery in the Township.  On April 23, 1842 Jacob and Catherine King sold 1 acre of ground to the elders of German Reformed and Lutheran Churches which included a burying ground already situated on the King farm.  The farm was purchased by the King family in 1832 from the Frary family.  The cemetery was supposedly set apart at the death of Mrs. Frary who was to be the first person buried there and her husband Phineas being second. 

 

MC GORMLEY CEMETERY
Located on McGormley Road
In 1844 John and Margaret Cochran sold 1 acre of land to the Lutheran Church of Ballville Township.  William McGormley was one of the trustees of the church.  The purchase of the land was for a meeting house and a burying ground.   In 1879 the Trustees of the reformed Church bought a 1 acre parcel from Phillip and Martha Michaels next to the old burial ground known at that time as William McGormley Cemetery.  The deed stated that “the church building when completed shall be open and used by whatever Christian Denomination for religious services when not in use by the Reformed congregation.  In 1927 the trustees of the Reformed Church turned the cemetery over to the Trustees of Ballville Township.

A MILITARY CEMETERY (Veterans Section at McGormley) was set aside to honor men and women who served in the Army, Navy, Air Force, Marines and Coast Guard.   Two flag poles were donated by Tom Horvath Funeral Home.  The large flag pole and monument were donated by the Veterans of Foreign Wars of Fremont.

 

 

 

 

 

  



OAKWOOD MAUSOLEUM
Located on Oakwood St.

The Fremont Mausoleum was built in 1916-1917 by the Latschau Brothers who built mausoleums around the state.  The land on which the mausoleum stands is owned by Oakwood Cemetery.  The Fremont Mausoleum Association was formed to sell and maintain the crypts along with the building.  The Association paid Oakwood cemetery for opening and sealing the crypts at the time of burial.  Eventually most of the crypts were used and there was little income to maintain the building.  The Association was reduced to a few people and soon the mausoleum was turned over to an attorney who ran the organization for a few years.  The mausoleum was in a deteriorating state and in 1997 was turned over to the Ballville Trustees.

DECKER CEMETERY
Location on Tiffin Road

Lawrence and Mary Hoover sold 86.67 square rods to the Township Trustees of the Union Burying Ground in June 1866.

 

 

 

 



MOUNT LEBANON CEMETERY
Located on Finefrock Road

In 1863 Newton S and Carrie Long sold ground to the Church of the United Brethren in Christ.  The plot of ground was on the south side of “Long’s Grave Yard”.  Newton Long was the son of the Rev Michael Long who was a prominent preacher during the mid 1800’s and lived on the property.  A picture of him and the house he lived in are shown on the side.  The brick house still remains on the south of the corner of Cole Road and Finefrock.  He served the Green Creek circuit with included Mt. Lebanon, the Brick Chapel, Willis, Green Springs and Hedge Town.  On June 15, 1889 the graveyard was deeded to the Ballville Trustees for a public burying ground.